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Part 3: And so Functional Aromatherapy® was born!

Part 3: And so Functional Aromatherapy® was born!

My husband likes to send me memes. It’s his way of picking me up on a bad day or to kick my ass into gear when needed.

As I was in the middle of my studies I received this from him:

Quote: They told me I'd never get this far. They were right, I got further.

I finally was able to tell the doctor what I was doing, and though at first he placated me like a child who just learned there were stars in the sky, I was making strides.

I hadn’t COMPLETELY gotten him to buy in yet, it was going to take a lot more work to make my cynical husband a true believer, but he wasn't as close minded as before.

I did enough to register for my Registered Aromatherapist (RA) Exam. It was still some time off, but now I had that first goal to attain.

I started studying Latin names, chemical constituents and the like. Fun stuff, right?

I knew my husband was bending when he started to ask for products to further help his patients, I trained my office girls to start taking over my tasks at our integrative medicine practice and holed myself up my lab.

I felt like a mad scientist and it was AMAZING!

He asked me to make him something for toenail fungus. I thought this was a somewhat easy request, little did I know what it would lead to.

A few days after I made the blend (see recipe below) my husband called me….

Him: “What did you do?”

Me: “What now?” (Already exasperated, cause some days that's what he does to me.)

Now he’s huffy. “You cured a toenail fungus!" (Another win!)

“Well, of course I did.” I said. I started laughing. I wasn’t in trouble this time.

It was finally time to put Functional Aromatherapy into full effect.

1 ml of essential oil example

Functional Aromatherapy® Toenail fungus Oil

  • 12 drops of Clove Bud
  • 6 drops of Green Myrtle
  • 6 drops of Litsea Cubea (May Chang)
  • Carrier oil of your choice
  • 1 oz glass bottle

Add drops to bottle, and finish off with carrier oil. Apply a drop to infected area a couple times a day.

If you're looking for the beginning of the story, check out Part 1: The moment it all started for me and Part 2: My Functional Aromatherapy® journey continues! to get caught up.




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