Botanical Oracle: Foxglove, Digitalis purpurea

Botanical Oracle: Foxglove, Digitalis purpurea

As we do a deeper dive into the Botanical Oracle, I think it's important to note that not all plants we discuss are safe. Foxglove is one of those plants. With all the plants in the world, there is no need to use foxglove in any medicinal capacity, and it should never be ingested.

This plant is well-known in the Anglo-Saxon community. It is a common wildflower and in folklore, it is the home of a fairy. It’s sometimes called folksglove and is where a lot of fae aspects come from. It is considered a magical plant and is used with great respect and caution.

Foxglove Digitalis purpurea

It is no surprise then that Thompson uses the word connection as the Oracle property of foxglove. Because it is considered magical in some lore, foxglove is a plant thought to connect different dimensions, associated with the planet Venus and love.

Picking this card was really about my connection with certain people in my life. There are a few people in particular I've had to pause and really look at the connections I've had with them. Is this connection healthy? Is this connection or relationship beneficial to me? At the end of the day, does this connection hurt me? Or am I simply feeling disconnected from myself and others? If so, how do I fix it?

I find it ironic that a poisonous plant means connection. I understand Thompson's reasoning for the choice, but when I pulled this card, I knew it was about toxic connections in my life. Now I needed to figure out what to do. Perhaps sit and think about what this is reflecting in my life and if the next day’s card can help answer that.

Magical and mysterious dark forest

How do you handle a toxic connection? What are your tricks of the trade, and how do you even know there is a toxic connection? Comment below!

Then click here to get your own copy of the Botanical Oracle by Siolo Thompson




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